Diabetes risk cut by SLEEPING: THIS is how many hours you need to avoid condition

The risk of developing gestational diabetes during pregnancy increases 70% when patients slept for less than six hours per night on average, researchers claimed.

Gestational diabetes is a condition which can develop if pregnant women have high blood glucose levels during pregnancy.

It usually develops in third trimester - between 24 and 28 weeks - but tends to disappear after the baby is born.

Between three and seven per cent of pregnant women develop the condition, scientists predicted.

While the condition usually disappears after giving birth, women are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes in later life.

Baby’s born to mothers with gestational diabetes are also more at risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity.

But, sleeping more during pregnancy reduces the risk of developing gestational diabetes, researchers revealed.

“This is the first meta-analysis to find that both self-reported and objectively measured short sleep duration was associated with elevated blood sugar levels in pregnancy as well as an increased risk for developing gestational diabetes,” said Sirimon Reutrakul, lead author of the study.

“More research is needed to confirm our findings, and to determine whether sleep extension may be beneficial in lowering the risk of gestational diabetes.”

The researchers analysed more than 17,000 pregnant women and their sleep patterns.

They also measured their blood sugar levels, and sleep duration in the women, which included 287 with gestational diabetes.

Sleeping for less than six hours meant the risk of gestational diabetes increased 70%, the researchers found.

Gestational diabetes can be managed by diet and exercise, according to Diabetes UK.

The condition shouldn’t be taken lightly, despite it disappearing after the baby is born, the charity added.

Risks can be mines with good care, and follow up treatment.



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