Prostate cancer WARNING: Eating processed meat could increase risk of disease

Prostate cancer usually develops slowly, so signs and symptoms of the condition are difficult to spot.

More than 40,000 new cases of the cancer are diagnosed every year, and eating specific foods may increase the risk of developing the condition.

There is sufficient evidence to say eating processed meat increases the chances of cancer, said the World Health Organization (WHO).

Eating plenty of fruit and vegetables, and having a diet rich in fibre, could lower the risk of prostate cancer, scientists have also claimed.

“There is convincing evidence that [processed meat] causes cancer,” said the WHO.

“The evaluation is usually based on epidemiological studies showing the development of cancer in exposed humans.

“In the case of processed meat, this classification is based on sufficient evidence from epidemiological studies that eating processed meat causes colorectal cancer.”

According to medical website Healthline, the WHO’s warning extends to prostate cancer.

Lunch meats and hot dogs are types of processed meat. Healthline recommended swapping them for lean poultry, fresh or canned fish, or beans and legumes.

The risk of developing prostate cancer is also increased by eating large amounts of dairy products, according to research.

Scientists suggest eating plenty of fruit and vegetables to lower your risk of the cancer. They contain plenty of vitamins and miners, as well as plenty of cancer-fighting chemicals, including carotenoids and flavonols, according to scientists at the University of California, San Francisco.

Prostate cancer symptoms only develop after the prostate is big enough to affect the urethra, said the NHS.

Urinating more frequently, and feeling like the bladder is never empty, could be signs of prostate cancer.

While the symptoms shouldn’t be ignored, they are more likely to be caused by other medical conditions than cancer.

As the cancer develops very slowly, men tend to live for decades without any treatment, or need for treatment.